Tag Archives: triathlon

TT075 Training Experimentation, Ketogenic Diets & MMA Fighting

Hillary Spires makes her third appearance on the show to talk about her experiments with her training and diet and the much faster run times she has achieved.

Her 5k time dropped from 24 minutes to 20:19 and her 10k time dropped from 47 minutes to 42:30.  She has resumed her triathlon training in prep for a half ironman.  Hillary Spires Muay Thai

Last fall she started training for Muay Thai, a form of MMA fighting.  She also switched to a ketogenic diet (high fat/low carbohydrate).  When she returned to running she had huge drops in her time despite very little run training and some very high intensity workouts.

Hillary was on episode 55 talking about her first year of racing as she prepared for Ironman Canada, and she returned on episode 64 after she completed Ironman Canada.  

Links/Show Mentions

Hillary’s MMA Fight

Torbjorn Sindballe on low fat diets – Triathlete Training Podcast episode 14

Netflix documentary on Barkley Marathons

Hillary’s High Intensity Workout
Incline 10
Per Hillary, level 7 is an 8:30 mile, level 9 is a 6:40 mile, level 10 is 6:00 mile, and level 11 is a 5:30 mile

90 seconds level 7
90s rest (stand on rails)
4 sets

60 seconds level 9
60 seconds rest
4 sets

30 seconds level 10
30 seconds rest
2 sets

30 seconds level 11
30 seconds rest
2 sets

Hillary ran a 20:19 5k after this.  This is a very high intensity and difficult workout. Slower runners should reduce the speed and/or incline for this workout.

TT072: Triathlon 2.0: Data Driven Performance Training w/Jim Vance

Coach Jim Vance joins the podcast as a repeat guest to talk about his new book, Triathlon 2.0: Data-Driven Performance Training.

Jim worked on this book for 4 years before it’s release in early 2016. It’s a detailed book for serious athletes willing to look at their training data and use it to improve.  Jim was a former professional triathlete and now, as a well known coach, he has become an expert in analyzing training data.    Triathlon 2.0

This book builds on concepts in Joe Friel’s Triathlete’s Training Bible and uses charts and graphs to show how to use and understand your data.

Even if you don’t use a power meter, and most experienced athletes should, you can still learn how to use data from your GPS unit to improve your running.

I feel confident in saying this will be one of the most useful books for serious triathletes.  

http://www.coachvance.com/

Does Running Shorten Your Lifespan?

TT070: Mobility For Faster Performance, Alexander Technique, & Nasal Breathing w/George Dallam

George Dallam returns to discuss his latest studies.  George was a popular guest on episodes 3, 4, and 25.  This time we talk about how mobility might improve running speed.  George is doing a study on the Functional Movement Screen (FMS).  FMS is a test of seven movements and a score is given based on results (a video of the seven movements is included below).

George’s study is testing whether increasing mobility over a period of 8 weeks might improve running speed in a one mile test.  Results from other movement studies have shown that improved mobility decreases the chance of injury in other sports.

We briefly touch on the Alexander Technique. Named after Australian F.M. Alexander (1869-1955), Wikipedia describes it as a method “to avoid unnecessary muscular and mental tension during everyday activities”.  Based on what little I’ve learned I’d describe it as a method for good posture.

In my first interview with George three years ago we talked about nasal breathing.  He has completed his study and found benefits to breathing only through the nose during exercise, which include a reduced likelihood of EIB, or exercise induced asthma.  George only breathes through his nose while training and racing.

George is a professor at Colorado State University in Pueblo.  He was the first USA Triathlon National Teams coach and he coached Olympic triathlete Hunter Kemper.

Links

Alexander Technique

Functional movement screen

TT069: 2016 Olympic Hopeful Joe Maloy

Joe Maloy

Joe Running Toward Victory @ 2016 Tritonman Triathlon

Joe Maloy is currently 2nd in the point standings to qualify for the 2016 United States Men’s Olympic team. There is just one more qualifying race at which to earn points and that’s the ITU WTS event in Yokohama, Japan May 14. Joe, age 30, talks about his path in triathlon and his current training base in Poway, California.

It’s an inside look at the process and dedication required to become an Olympian.  Joe swam in college, won 2009 USAT Age Group National Championships, and continued to improve as he pursued ITU draft legal racing.  Have a listen and you’ll have someone to root for in Brazil if Joe qualifies for the team.

Follow Joe:

Joetriathlon.com
https://www.instagram.com/joemaloy/

USA Triathlon Olympic Point Totals as of February 2016:

US Triathlon Olympic Qualifying

 

 

 

 

 

 

Point available for the top 18 spots at in Yokohama (multiply points by 1.066667 for that race):

Points for Final Olympic Triathlon Qualifier

TT067: Don’t Make The Mistakes I Made/Career Triathlon Lessons

2004 Ironman WisconsinEpisode 67 includes a look back at the mistakes I made in my racing career.  I have mostly great memories of my racing career, but if I could have avoided the following mistakes I would have been more successful

  • Not having an optimal peer group when I was younger
  • Focusing on many types of racing: Ironman, duathlon, bike racing
  • Not having a coach
  • Poor nutrition
  • Not having a consistent riding group in the winter
  • Not stretching enough
  • Not taking proper rest
  • Not working enough on my swim
  • Not being organized well enough

I also answer a question about Ironman nutrition from a listener named Courtney.

TT066: From Runner To Ironman Lake Placid in 12 Months

Tiff Pfluger was a runner. She thought triathletes were crazy even as her husband got into the sport. She went to volunteer at race Ironman Lake Placid in 2014 and decided that maybe triathletes weren’t crazy. She signed up for Ironman Lake Placid the next day and did the race one year later.

This is her journey from going a collegiate running background to an Ironman finisher at age 35.

TT065: First Year Triathlete Daniel Fisher

Daniel Fisher first got the idea to do a triathlon in 2014. In 2015 he signed up, and the New Jersey AC Sprint Duathlon was his first race.

He is 29 years old and he was 258 pounds when he started.  Now he is hooked.  This podcast is the journey of his first year.

“I only wish I had done one sooner and had done more throughout the year.”

TT064: Ironman Canada 2015 With Hilary Spires

First year triathlete Hilary Spires returns for an update on her first season.

Her first triathlon was early in 2015, then she did a 70.3 on June 14, and Ironman Canada July 26.  She was very well prepared. Her original goal was to break 14 hours, then she changed it do breaking 13 hours.  It was cold at Iromman Canada and she had to wear a garbage bag early in the bike to warmup up.  She liked the first year so much that she is signed up for Ironman Canada in 2016.  Did she make her 13 hour goal?  Have a listen to find out.

Check our her first appearance on the show in episode 53.

TT062: Hydration & Heat Prep From a Hot Ironman Lake Placid and Mont-Tremblant

Canadian Allan MacKenzie recently completed Ironman Lake Placid and Ironman Mont-Tremblant in hot conditions.  We talked about that experience and his heat and hydration questions following the race.  I answer his questions from my own knowledge, but I also add George Dallam’s answers.  

George, a guest on episodes 3, 4, and 25,  is a professor at Colorado State University in Pueblo.  He was the first USA Triathlon National Teams coach and he coached Olympic triathlete Hunter Kemper.  His answers were originally in response to my email, and he allowed me to publish his email here.

Each of Allan’s questions is listed below, and George’s answers follow.

  1. For someone who doesn’t have the opportunity to train much outdoors in high temperatures, what are the best ways to be prepared if race day ends up being really hot?

Acclimate – hot tub, sauna, indoors with heater/humidifier, any stationary training as well. It is all about producing a high sweat rate.

Here is the link to George’s two week hot tub protocol –http://triathletetraining.com/heat-acclimation-protocol/

  1.   How long does it take to get acclimatized/prepared to race in warmer than normal temperatures?

Even one session can help and you can probably maximize over as little as 2-3 weeks with daily sessions.

  1.    Other than adding more sodium to my diet, are there other things I can do with my diet to help get better acclimatizes to the heat?

I’m not an advocate of adding more sodium to the diet, just the opposite.  The currently in vogue notion that “salty sweaters” need more sodium ignores the underlying issue.  Salty sweaters are inevitably consuming more sodium than they realize so the body must constantly excrete the excess.  By reducing sodium in the diet your body will improve in its ability to preserve sodium over time..  Further by greatly increasing your sodium intake over normal in a given racing situation you probably increase the risk of heat stroke – sodium reduces our sweating capacity by holding water in the vascular and interstitial spaces.  The best approach to heat tolerance is appropriate acclimation and a low salt diet in my estimation.

  1.     What are your thoughts on using arm coolers and/or knee coolers to help to stay cool during races?

Pre cooling to lower the core temperature prior to a hot race is certainly very useful.  If you can create a cooling effect on the fly that is certainly useful as well.  However, to do so means carrying extra weight in most cases in the form of a cold solution or ice.  The idea that any clothing enhances cooling in comparison to what the bare skin can accomplish during periods of heavy sweating is misleading.  See this review.  http://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00007256-200333130-00001#page-1 Some fabrics are relatively more cooling than others (cotton versus wool for instance) but all limit cooling to some degree by  inhibiting the evaporative cooling process in some manner. Maximum skin exposure provides the greatest surface area for sweating and the resulting evaporative effect created as air moves past the body.  The thought with white reflective clothing is that you might avoid radiant heat gain, however the loss in evaporative cooling potential offsets that possible effect.   Of course wearing or not wearing clothing must also be considered in the need for limiting UV exposure and for creating both aero and aquadynamics.   Consider, however that shaved body parts are often nearly as aero/aquadynamic as fabrics designed for the purpose and shaving further increases the potential for evaporative heat loss.  Basically in the heat you should wear the minimal clothing necessary or required and it should be white or light colored.

Very likely your arms and legs have sufficiently keratinized  (tanned) through normal training exposure so that you shouldn’t need to cover them with clothing to prevent sun burn – doing so will reduce your evaporative cooling potential.

5.  And what is your opinion on salt tabs?

See above – this is a worst case scenario.

  1.      When I raced Ironman Mont Tremblant (MT) this year I didn’t pee during the bike portion at all.

That is an obvious indication to me that I was dehydrated. I’m don’t think it had a significant effect on my bike, but I feel it adversely effected my run. Usually I have a good gauge on this and am often guilty of drinking too much. What would you recommend to help prevent this from happening again?

Some relative dehydration can actually be beneficial to performance (although less than ideal when it comes to the possibility of thrombus formation) because you are simply lighter.  This might be true up to about 2% loss in body weight – possibly more if you train in those conditions.  The primary key to maintaining hydration is to drink fluids that are isotonic (similar salt concentration to your body fluids)  – this approach maximizes absorption at the gut and reduces the tendency for diuresis during the race (you’d really rather not pee if possible).    I would drink on schedule in small amounts if you want to prevent dehydration based on your typical weight loss (2 cups per pound). Something like traditional Gatorade cut in  half with water gets you there – most conventional “salty” drinks have way more salt than is present in the blood stream.  I would use Tim Noakes advice and drink to thirst if you want to allow for a little normal dehydration.   If you have had a reason to believe that you are at risk for thrombus formation I would take the first option and stay hydrated when training and racing.   You can also pre-hydrate pretty effectively using a glycerol solution if you have great concerns for dehydration.

  1.       I wore a visor in Lake Placid (LP), but opted for a hat during MT (so that I could put ice under my hat to try and stay cool). Which do you recommend for a really hot day?

Ice under the hat is effective on the fly cooling strategy – see above.

  1.       I have fair skin and usually need sunscreen to prevent getting a burn. In LP I applied it in the am before the swim and again in T2. I planned to do the same in MT, but I forgot to do so in T2 and I think this really played a role with my run time. Does a sun burn have a significant effect on my ability to stay hydrated?

Interesting question.   I’m not aware of any direct effect of sunburn and/or sun screens on evaporative cooling potential.  However, a quick search reveals the following studyhttp://search.proquest.com/openview/3ca96ce6df9654a03c18b6e0cb47d8bd/1?pq-origsite=gscholar which suggests no negative effect of wearing sunscreen and a possible type II statistical error – suggesting there may even be a small positive effect through an improved temperature gradient (core to skin temperature differential) which the study failed to find probably due to too few subjects or the fact that the difference were so small.  You might also experiment in training with sunscreens that are more water resistant – Bull Frog comes to mind – so you can avoid reapplication after the swim.

 

TT061: Journey From Beginner Triathlete to Professional

Brad Williams is a first-year pro triathlete living in the UK.  He did his first triathlon in 2008 while serving in the Air Force in Korea. He was soon hooked. He hired a coach in 2011 and continued to progress with solid results. He earned his first prize money paycheck this year with a 6th place finish at Ironman UK.  This episode chronicles his journey from beginner to professional.

Links:

Brad’s Website

@BW_Tri

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